flagg0t:

If someone tells you to listen to a song, listen to it.  It may be the worst song you have ever heard but they wanted to share it with you.  That is really special.  If it makes them feel a certain way and they are so adamant about you hearing it, take 5 minutes to hear it.  It shows a lot about someone.  

(via ineedthislikeaholeinthehead)

To be beautiful means to be yourself.You don’t need to be accepted by others. You need to accept yourself. When you are born a lotus flower, be a beautiful lotus flower, don’t try to be a magnolia flower. If you crave acceptance and recognition and try to change yourself to fit what other people want you to be, you will suffer all your life. True happiness and true power lie in understanding yourself, accepting yourself, having confidence in yourself.
Thích Nhất Hạnh (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via black-footed)

I’ve come upon something that disturbs me deeply: We have fought hard and long for integration, as I believe we should have, and I know that we will win. But I’ve come to believe we’re integrating into a burning house.

I’m afraid that America may be losing what moral vision she may have had. And I’m afraid that even as we integrate, we are walking into a place that does not understand that this nation needs to be deeply concerned with the plight of the poor and disenfranchised. Until we commit ourselves to ensuring that the underclass is given justice and opportunity, we will continue to perpetuate the anger and violence that tears at the soul of this nation.

Martin Luther King Jr. to Harry Belafonte shortly before his assassination

This contains a reference to a poignant line by James Baldwin from The Fire Next Time“Do I really want to be integrated into a burning house?” 

Important food for thought as MLK’s legacy and activism continues to be distorted.

(via owning-my-truth)

(via black-footed)

izanzanwin:

[Native American woman from Plains region, half-length portrait, facing right, with baby on her back] / Beach, N.Y.

  • Copyright by Howard D. Beach, Buffalo, N.Y.

(via xangoblazedifiyah)

Telling a young girl she can’t wear what she wants because it’s not appropriate encourages the idea that men’s reactions should dictate society’s norms, and that all women are meta-Eves, tempting and ensnaring men with our sultry-eyed gaze. My parents’ culture is steeped in patriarchy, in the philosophy of the one-step machismo machine, where there is just one kind of man, and two kinds of women: the angel and the whore. These limited ideas of masculinity breed men who want ownership of women.
Fariha Roison (via girl-violence)

(via america-wakiewakie)

historynet:

Actresses Marilyn Monroe, left, and Jane Russell placing handprints in the wet cement in front of Grauman’s theater. June 26, 1953. [970x615]

helloimedua:

sixpenceee:

This is beautiful and it’s amazing to me that it had such a positive outcome and not lifelong hateful grudges, which is probably what these attackers deserved. 

FOR MORE PORTRAITS AND THE OFFICIAL WEBPAGE

This is perfect and beautiful and amazing

(via black-footed)

Most girls are relentlessly told that we will be treated how we demand to be treated. If we want respect, we must respect ourselves.

This does three things. Firstly, it gets men off the hook for being held accountable for how they treat women. And secondly, it makes women feel that the mistreatment and sometimes outright violence they face due to their gender is primarily their fault. And thirdly, it positions women to be unable to speak out against sexism because we are made to believe any sexism we experience would not have happened if we had done something differently.

I cannot demand a man to respect me. No more than I can demand that anybody do anything. I can ask men to be nice to me. But chances are if I even have to ask he does not care to be nice. I can express displeasure when I’m not being respected. But that doesn’t solve the issue that I was disrespected in the first place.

I can choose to not deal with a man once he proves to be disrespectful and/or sexist. But even that does not solve the initial problem of the fact that I had to experience being disrespected in the first place.

As a young girl, I wish that instead of being told that I needed to demand respect from men that I had been told that when I am not respected by men that it’s his fault and not mine. But that would require that we quit having numerous arbitrary standards for what it means to be a “respectable” woman. It would mean that I am not judged as deserving violence based on how I speak, what I wear, what I do, and who I am.

excerpt from “FYI, I Cannot “Demand” Respect From Men so Stop Telling Me That!" @ One Black Girl. Many Words.  (via fajazo)

We need to start teaching all young boys to be accountable. We’ve failed our young boys and girls for too long.

(via allmyfriendsarewhite)

(via thetiniestginger)

bebinn:

mysalivaismygifttotheworld:

afrafemme:

A friend and I were out with our kids when another family’s two-year-old came up. She began hugging my friend’s 18-month-old, following her around and smiling at her. My friend’s little girl looked like she wasn’t so sure she liked this, and at that moment the other little girl’s mom came up and got down on her little girl’s level to talk to her.

“Honey, can you listen to me for a moment? I’m glad you’ve found a new friend, but you need to make sure to look at her face to see if she likes it when you hug her. And if she doesn’t like it, you need to give her space. Okay?”

Two years old, and already her mother was teaching her about consent.

My daughter Sally likes to color on herself with markers. I tell her it’s her body, so it’s her choice. Sometimes she writes her name, sometimes she draws flowers or patterns. The other day I heard her talking to her brother, a marker in her hand.

“Bobby, do you mind if I color on your leg?”

Bobby smiled and moved himself closer to his sister. She began drawing a pattern on his leg with a marker while he watched, fascinated. Later, she began coloring on the sole of his foot. After each stoke, he pulled his foot back, laughing. I looked over to see what was causing the commotion, and Sally turned to me.

“He doesn’t mind if I do this,” she explained, “he is only moving his foot because it tickles. He thinks its funny.” And she was right. Already Bobby had extended his foot to her again, smiling as he did so.

What I find really fascinating about these two anecdotes is that they both deal with the consent of children not yet old enough to communicate verbally. In both stories, the older child must read the consent of the younger child through nonverbal cues. And even then, consent is not this ambiguous thing that is difficult to understand.

Teaching consent is ongoing, but it starts when children are very young. It involves both teaching children to pay attention to and respect others’ consent (or lack thereof) and teaching children that they should expect their own bodies and their own space to be respected—even by their parents and other relatives.

And if children of two or four can be expected to read the nonverbal cues and expressions of children not yet old enough to talk in order to assess whether there is consent, what excuse do full grown adults have?

I try to do this every day I go to nursery and gosh it makes me so happy to see it done elsewhere.

Yes, consent is nonsexual, too!

Not only that, but one of the reasons many child victims of sexual abuse don’t reach out is that they don’t have the understanding or words for what is happening to them, and why it isn’t okay. Teaching kids about consent helps them build better relationships and gives them the tools to seek help if they or a friend need our protection.

(via thatfeministqueer)

(via pejolin)

wocinsolidarity:

bemusedlybespectacled:

draenei-tailor:

breakingbaeddel:

if capitalism is so voluntary, why does america have to keep using the cia to make sure other countries keep it?

If the free market naturally corrects problems, why do we have to give subsidies to large business interests and bail out banks?

If capitalism ensures that those that work the hardest make the most money, why doesn’t a coal miner make as much as a CEO?

image

(via kelsey-leann)

abby-howard:

Today’s Junior Scientist Power Hour is all about ladies and their weird periods! What are periods? We don’t really know. But you can always tell when a woman is on her period because she has opinions that men don’t like, and sometimes they get mad!

It’s not like women get mad any other times, or that even if a woman is on her period, you should still listen to the words she says and not write them off as “crazy uterus talk”

(via theragingfeminist)